In this lesson, Ed is going to show us a few things about YouTube.

YouTube

YouTube

Getting Started With YouTube

Now, before you decide to skip this video because you already know everything you need to know about YouTube – bear with this lesson. Ed’s got a few tricks up his sleeves…

The first thing to do is sign in to YouTube.

If you created a gmail account recently or already have one, you can use that account to log in. By using your existing Google account – you can keep keep things simple and integrated. I’m all about keeping it simple. There will be some additional benefits we’ll learn about later.

If you haven’t got a Google or gmail account – you can create a YouTube account. It will work either way.

Let’s either sign up or sign in:

YouTube - Sign Up or Sign In

YouTube - Sign Up or Sign In

If you’re signing up, you’ll see this screen.

YouTube - Sign Up

YouTube - Sign Up

You know the drill, just fill in your information and create your account.

If you’re signing in, you probably don’t need to see this – but I’ll show you anyway.

YouTube - Sign In

YouTube - Sign In

You already know what to do…

Once you’re logged in, you’ll find your home page. You can subscribe to feeds, Google will recommend videos for you – there are lots of things you can do to customize your page. We can get into that sort of stuff later. For now, Ed takes us to his “channel” page at:

http://youtube.com/user/eddale

And guess what we find here…yep, an RSS feed

YouTube - RSS From Ed Dale

YouTube - RSS From Ed Dale

– thank you Flock. So, you can add a feed of Ed Dale videos to your Google Reader.

Google Reader - Add Feed

Google Reader - Add Feed

Next notice how Ed briefly mentions how Flock lets us know about media streams. We won’t learn about it at this point, but he does say this will be very useful for blogging purposes. More on that later…

Another thing to notice – the YouTube video search engine. You can add YouTube video to your search drop-down menu in the upper right corner. We learned how to do that earlier with the Summize search engine.

YouTube - Add Search Engine

Add Search Engine

Ed shows us how we can subscribe to someone’s video channel to receive updates anytime we’re logged into YouTube.

YouTube - Subscribe

YouTube - Subscribe

However, if you use the RSS feeds and add them to your Google Reader – you’ll know without having to log into YouTube. Plus, you can view the video right within your reader.

Flock gives you an email option, a blog option and a view stream option – right across the top of the video.

Ed says he uses the blog option the most. Flock will automatically frame up a blog post for you around that video. We’ll be learning more about blogging as we get further into the thirty day challenge.

We look at the ratings bar – that’s a place for you to give people your rating. Additionally, there is a link where you can watch the video in higher definition.

YouTube - Ratings and High Quality Option

YouTube - Ratings and High Quality Option

You can even view the video in full screen mode. In high quality mode, it’s not too bad.

There’s a “share” tab – where you can socially bookmark or share on MySpace, Facebook and Digg.

YouTube - Share

YouTube - Share

If you click on the “more share options” link, your options expand – you can also share on StumbleUpon and several other bookmarking services. (In the screen shot above, it says “fewer share options” – if you click it, the options go away and the “more share options” link appears in its place.)

YouTube - more share options

YouTube - more share options

You can blog about it – or e-mail it. Lots of ways to share…

As you let this lesson sink in, try to think about it in terms of your niche. Now, maybe you don’t have a niche yet. That’s okay, when you do have a niche – you’ll be learning a lot of ways to quickly become known as an expert or a main resource for a particular topic.

You’re learning ways to find, sort, aggregate and share information. Most people who get online don’t know how to do the things we’re learning – and most people don’t have the time. So if you can position yourself as an authority within a niche, you may be able to turn that into a money making business online.

On the favorites tab…

YouTube - Favorites

YouTube - Favorites

If you favorite a video, things like AppleTV and possibly Tivo allow you to watch YouTube videos on your home television set.

I’ll be honest, I don’t have Tivo or Apple TV – so I’m a little bit lost. But Ed promises a video later. i think the point is, YouTube is a powerful medium for distributing video content – and because of the sharing and blogging capabilities, the video content you’re distributing doesn’t even have to be your own.

Okay – that’s all for this round. Remember to give somebody a hug…

Next up – Google Subscribed Links – powerful stuff!

Feel free to leave your comments below – and if you appreciate this post, please take a moment to spread the word…

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If you followed along with the last Thirty Day Challenge lesson – or signed into Google Reader using your Google account, you should now have a blank Google Reader in front of you. Ed’s video is viewable below:

Google Reader – RSS Feed Reader

Like Ed says – We need to fill up our Google Reader with “RSS feeds.”  What does that mean – and what are they?

RSS is one of those “buzzwords” on the internet.  Originally, the acronym RSS stood for RDF Site Survey – where RDF stands for Resource Description Framework.  (You know it is getting complicated when you have acronyms within acronyms.)  It’s also been referred to as “Rich Site Survey.”  More recently, the term “Really Simple Syndication” has been associated with RSS.  To keep things simple, let’s assume we mean “Really Simple Syndication” when we talk about RSS here.

Almost every blog or website you see, news services, friendfeed, even twitter – they offer information as an RSS feed.  It’s a way to distribute or syndicate information.  RSS feeds are a simple way for you to stay completely informed about your particular niche, or about any topic or hobby you may be interested in.  You’ll be able to process so much information and leverage that knowledge in ways that will literally blow your mind as you continue this year’s thirty day challenge.

But not until we add some RSS feeds to this blank page.  The first thing we should double check is our feed set-up in Flock.  So go to the Tools menu and Options for PC or the Flock menu and Preferences for Mac.  From there, go to the “feeds” tab and make sure that we select “subscribe to the feed using” – Google.

Setting up the \

Next up watch the Google Reader Intro video on your log-in page….

Done yet?  It’s not very long….

Okay – let’s go find some feeds…

The first and most obvious choice would be the Thirty Day Challenge Blog.  So let’s go there, if you installed your Thirty Day Challenge Toolbar, you can use the handy link there – otherwise go to: http://www.thirtydaychallenge.com/blog

Once there, look up by your web address bar – you should see that RSS icon glowing orange.  This indicates the presence of an RSS feed on the current page.  (Flock makes it pretty obvious.)

Google Reader - 30DC RSS feed

You simply click that orange button to view the drop-down menu of available feeds – then click on the “Thirty Day Challenge” feed.  (Just like in the video.)

Up pops your Google options and you could either add the feed to your iGoogle home page or to Google Reader.  For today, we’ll focus on adding the feed to Google Reader…

Google Reader - Add To Google Reader

A sharing option pops up – we won’t get into that aspect for now.

Google Reader - Share With Friends

In future training, we’ll learn more about this feature and how teams can utilize it.

You now have the Thirty Day Challenge feed in your list.

Google Reader - Subscribed to Thirty Day Challenge Blog

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Let’s go find another feed – how about Ed’s Twitter feed:

You can find it here: http://www.twitter.com/Ed_Dale

Google Reader - Ed_Dale On Twitter

Locate the orange RSS button by your web address bar – click it.

Google Reader - Ed Dale Twitter RSS Feed

Then select/click one of Ed’s twitter feeds – add it to Google Reader, and there you have it – your second feed for Google Reader.

Google Reader - Subscribed to Ed Dale Twitter Feed

Let’s find some more to add – how about a funky “Summize” search.  Go to: http://summize.com/

Google Reader - Summize

This is a search engine that allows you to search Twitter in real time.  You can run a search for a particular term, in this case it’s “#30dc” – but what it you searched for a niche-related term? Think about it – you would know about current conversations going on about your niche or area of interest – very powerful stuff…

Back to the #30dc search:

Google Reader - Summize Search #30dc

Up comes a feed containing every tweet containing “#30dc” and lo and behold – there’s an RSS feed available.  Time to click the orange button, select the feed and add it to Google Reader.

Google Reader - Subscribed to Summize #30dc Feed

**Bonus time – if you actually watch the video, you learn about the “installable search engine.”  You can install the summize search engine and make it usable from your Flock search box.

Google Reader - Summize Installable Search Engine

Go ahead – click that little orange button – you know you want to…

Google Reader - Summize Search Engine f/video

If you just hover over it long enough, it’ll tell you what to do – “Click to view installable search engine”

Google Reader - Summize Search Install Button

Just click it and allow Flock to install the Summize Twitter Search Engine to your search engine pull-down menu.

It’s located in the upper right corner of Flock – and once you’ve installed the summize search engine to Flock, you can run a search on Summize, directly from your browser.  Just select the “Summize Twitter Search” from the search engine pull down menu in the upper right corner of Flock.

Google Reader - Summize In Search Menu

In this example, Ed uses the term “trout fishing” – he runs the search and adds the feed to his Google Reader.  Now, maybe “trout fishing” isn’t your niche – but you can run a search for your own niche keyword or phrase and subscribe to that feed.

Google Reader - Summize Results For Trout Fishing

Let the potential of that sink in for a while – for our next example, let’s use Google.  What happens if you just run a Google search for “trout fishing?”

Google Reader - Google Results - Trout Fishing

Pretty typical – let’s look up at our address bar…

Google Reader - Google Results - No Feed

Bummer, there’s no feed available for Google search results – BUT – if you click on the <more> menu and go down to
the <even more> option – you find “Alerts” at the top of the list on the left side.

Googler Reader - Google Alerts

Click “Alerts” – type in your keyword or phrase and create a Google Alert.

Google Reader - Create Google Alert

From the “manage alerts page”, click on the link to the “trout fishing” alert.

Google Reader - Manage Google Alerts

and grab that feed from the RSS button by your address bar.

Google Reader - Google Alerts Feed

You know what to do from here….

In the past, I’ve had these alerts e-mailed to me once a day – sometimes that can add dozens of extra e-mails a day.  Now, I can just add the RSS feed for the alert and add the feed into my Google Reader, freeing up some space and some time in my inbox.

A word of caution – you can go crazy with this.  So be careful not to go overboard at first.  Make sure you have the Thirty Day Challenge blog in your Google Reader.  We’ll learn a few more feeds to track in future lessons.

I suppose you could add the feed from this blog too – no pressure…

For those who participated in the Thirty Day Challenge last year – we learned how to use Bloglines.  You will see in the next couple of lessons why we’ve made the switch to Google Reader.  Pause and think about the awesomeness of this next few lines…

As you think about your niche, and begin to add related feeds to your Google Reader – you’ll see a paradigm shift in how you’re using the internet.  Instead of running around in circles, searching out information on the internet – you set up feeds and the information comes to your feed reader.  How’s that for making your time online more effective?

And in the next few lessons you’ll learn how to “churn and burn” through that information in a productive and effective way.

One other thing Ed mentions – you could track Ed’s feed, the sites he subscribes to.  That list of feeds is available as a feed as well.  Why would you want to do that?  Oh, I don’t know, maybe there’s something to the idea of modeling successful people if you want to become successful…Food for thought…

The next lesson promises to be a life-changer – or at the very least a big time-saver.  So stay tuned…and go give somebody a hug.

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