This post will take us a little bit further into Google Reader by way of the settings. Here’s the video from Ed Dale:

Google Reader – Part 3

Hopefully you’ve had a chance to get started using to Google Reader. You’ve signed up for a few feeds and you’ve started using list view to get through your feeds faster.

Let’s take a peek under the hood and give it a few tweaks – to start, log in to your Google Reader and click on the “settings” link in the upper right corner:

Google Reader - Settings

From the Settings > Preferences tab you can set:

  1. Language
  2. Start page
  3. Scroll Tracking in Expanded View
  4. Navigation Pane Display
  5. Confirm when marking all as read

The key setting here is to set the start page to “All Items – as shown below:

Google Reader - Settings-Preferences-Tab

Google Reader - Settings-Preferences-Tab

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Next up, the Subscriptions tab – here you can really dig in and manage the feeds you are subscribed to.

You can perform various searches from the search box in the upper right corner.

Google Reader - Subscriptions-Tab-Search-Box

Google Reader - Subscriptions-Tab-Search-Box

You can also “add to folders” or create a new folder from the “add to folders” drop down menu
In addition, you can delete a feed or you can rename a feed.

Google Reader - Rename-Delete-AddToFolder

Google Reader - Rename-Delete-AddToFolder

You can select multiple feeds and perform “more actions” from the drop down menu – like adding or removing tags – for search and filtering purposes.

Google Reader - More Actions Menu

Google Reader - More Actions Menu

The example given involves adding a tag to the feeds you follow for a particular niche – this technique will give you extra search leverage later on. It sounds like we will hear more about this as we get into the thirty day challenge content in August.

Ed also touches on the issue of having multiple Google Reader accounts to cover multiple niches. His answer – and it makes sense – just keep one Google Reader account. It’s organizational capabilities combined with its search functionality will be more than enough for you to be able to keep track of lots of feeds from lots of niches.

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Let’s look at the “Tags” tab:

You’ve got tags that you can make “public” or “private” – you may want to keep some of your niche information “private” – here’s the place to do it.

So far, I don’t have any tags like Ed does – guess I’ve still got a ways to go…

Google Reader - Tags Tab

Google Reader - Tags Tab

You can view the public page of your shared items. You can also email a link and add a clip to your site. We’ll get into this later in the challenge – teaching you how to use Google Reader as part of your internet marketing arsenal. For now, we’re more concerned with getting used to using it.

Now, on to the “Goodies” tab:

At this point, we won’t be covering or using anything in the way of these goodies – unless you are lucky enough to have an iPhone. I hear the implementation is brilliant!

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Moving along, let’s click on the “Import/Export” tab – if you’ve been using another feed reader, this will be pretty crucial – and pretty painless.

A lot of people, myself included – have been using Bloglines as a feed reader. And now, I get to “Say Goodbye To Bloglines” by exporting my feeds as an OPML file so they can be imported to Google Reader.

First, I’ll open up a new tab so I can log-in to Bloglines.

Google Reader - Bloglines

Google Reader - Bloglines

Then, on the left side – I scroll down to the “Additional Features” section and click on the “Export Subscriptions” link.

Google Reader - Bloglines-Export-Subscriptions

Google Reader - Bloglines-Export-Subscriptions

From there, a dialog box opens called “Opening export.opml” I want to save this file to disk – (my desktop) – so I select that option and click okay.

Google Reader - Opening-Export-OPML-dialog-box

Google Reader - Opening-Export-OPML-dialog-box

Now that the export.opml file has been saved to my computer – I just click back to my Google Reader Tab – where I’ve left the “Import/Export” dialog open…I browse for the file and click “upload.”

Google Reader - Import-OPML-file

Google Reader - Import-OPML-file

I love it when a plan comes together… Now instead of 3 feeds, I have the 75 I know and love…

Google Reader - My Subscriptions

Google Reader - My Subscriptions

That’s almost too easy – can I just say thanks, Ed? – Thanks Ed!

By the way, this will work with any feed reader that will export your subscriptions as a .opml file. Nowadays, almost all will…

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The last tab in our Google Reader Settings is the “friends” tab.

Google Reader - Friends Tab

Google Reader - Friends Tab

We won’t be doing much with this tab for now – there are ways to maybe use this within your teams, but for internet marketing purposes – we’ll be using other, more effective tools…

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Back to Google Reader – one of the major issues with feed readers in general is that once you read a post, it goes away. If you decide you want to read it again, you pretty much have to go to the blog – which means you just left your feed reader.

With Google Reader, the items don’t get deleted. You can mark them as read, and still find them later. Oddly enough, with Google being “pretty good” at search technology – now that your feeds don’t get deleted from your reader, you can search and filter through in several ways.

You can search through all items for a particular keyword or phrase. You can also filter through posts that you’ve read or starred or shared – there really are a lot of filtering options for this. If you’re new to this, it may not matter much – but when you’re following feeds across several niches, this will be a powerful resource for you.

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“One other thing” – Google is pretty good at determining “relevancy.” Based on the kinds of feeds you are subscribed to, Google can help you find additional feeds that may be relevant to you. And they do it from the “Discover” link:

Google Reader - Discover

Google Reader - Discover

Once you have added several feeds to your Google Reader, try clicking the “Discover” link and see what kind of feeds Google suggests. You may be pleasantly surprised…

Now, on the one hand, you don’t want to get in over your head – there’s no point getting overwhelmed with feeds. But on the other hand, Google Reader makes it so fast to scan through posts and so easy to manage and search through your feeds – Ed basically says, “Go for it.” I guess all I would add to that is 1) Know your limits 2) Use good judgement 3) Prioritize 4) Make sure you’re focusing on taking action.

You can learn and learn and learn and learn – if you don’t do anything with that knowledge, you’ll never get where you want to go. Focus on taking some action every day. You’ll be learning specific action steps throughout this year’s Thirty Day Challenge – the best thing you can do for yourself once you learn them…is to take them.

Here’s an action step you can take away from this post – go hug someone you love. 🙂

And if you appreciate this post, please take a moment to spread the word…

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“This is it!” It’s the video Ed’s been looking forward to showing us since the thirty day challenge preseason started. Check it out below…

Google Reader Part 2

What’s so special about Google Reader? On Ed’s recommendation, I started using Bloglines. I like how it looks – it’s been working for me. I look at Google Reader and think to myself – it’s nothing special. Until today…

In the video, Ed’s got 376 items to read in Google Reader. Holy RSS feeds, Ed-man! That’s a lot to read.

Now I know that I would click on one blog, like Mashable – read through all those posts, then go on to the next. And just like Ed mentions, I’d either get information overload or decide I needed to get some actual work done. In doing so, some feeds would get neglected.

Bottom line, to become an expert, a guru, a maven – you need to be able to gather information, sort it and process it in an effective way – here’s how Google Reader will help us do this.

First, we start by looking at our “All Items” list:

Google Reader - All Items

Google Reader - All Items

Next, and most importantly – we’ll make sure we’re using “List View” not “Expanded View”

Google Reader - List View

Google Reader - List View

By viewing all of the items in list view, a few things happen.

1) You are able to scan the headlines, you don’t have to view the entire post. This allows you to filter information more effectively and can be a real time saver.

2) You can expand an item in your list with a simple click – view the post and keep going.

Google Reader - Expanded Post

Google Reader - Expanded Post

Here in the video, while scanning through Yaro’s feed – he mentions a couple of things: “Share with note” and Friendfeed. At this point in the preseason, we’re not set up for this – but it is something we’ll be learning about soon. Stay tuned…

3) You see all the feeds sorted by date order, not by blog or feed order – so no feeds get neglected.

Note how Ed is bringing in feeds for things like: Twitterly, Friendfeed, his Twitter conversations, blog comments, other Twitter feeds, etc. – it’s really an effective way to stay on top of trends and information – and this technique really does give you enough time to process information efficiently.

4) He shows how to mark an item “keep as unread” so he can come back to it later.

Google Reader - Keep As Unread

Google Reader - Keep As Unread

5) If a post has an active link – you can click it and Google Reader will open it up in a new tab. This allows you to go follow that link, and then come back to your Reader. A great way to minimize distractions and maximize your time.

6) After you’ve finished going through your list – you simply mark all as read , and you’re done.

Google Reader - Mark All As Read

Google Reader - Mark All As Read

In the video, he mentions the “sharing” function again. Then he shows us “Disqus” – an amazing system everyone should be using on their blogs because of the viral traffic generation. (Going to have to check that out – thanks Ed.) They’ve enabled video commenting and track-backing, nice.

He “shares with a note” and posts that without having to leave Google Reader.

Other things you can do from Google Reader:

Google Reader - Star-Share-ShareWithNote-Email-Tags

Google Reader - Star-Share-ShareWithNote-Email-Tags

1) You can add a star

2) You can share

3) You can share with a note

4) You can email

5) You can add or edit tags

All from within Google Reader – give it a few days to sink in. Then imagine being able to process information about your niche this way. As you continue with the thirty day challenge, you’ll see this being a crucial way to dominate your niche.

Next lesson, we’ll learn about how to import the feeds from your current feed reader.

Remember to hug your kids….

And if you appreciate this post, please take a moment to spread the word…

Add to FacebookAdd to NewsvineAdd to DiggAdd to Del.icio.usAdd to StumbleuponAdd to RedditAdd to BlinklistAdd to Ma.gnoliaAdd to TechnoratiAdd to Furl